Photo 22 Jul 4,534 notes selchieproductions:

nowinexile:

#GazaUnderAttack

This is the strongest and saddest thing I’ve read in a long time. 

selchieproductions:

nowinexile:

#GazaUnderAttack

This is the strongest and saddest thing I’ve read in a long time. 

Video 22 Jul 8,512 notes

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

via NPR.
Photo 21 Jul 218,441 notes outofthecavern:

malformalady:

Australian scientists have developed a pair of anti-shark wetsuits that make divers appear invisible by camouflaging their bodies in the sea and trick sharks into thinking surfers are poisonous. A team of researchers from the University of Western Australia joined forces with designers from  Shark Attack Mitigation Systems (SAMS) to create the suits. The blue pattern of the Elude suit can’t be seen by the shark because the fish are colour blind. While the stripes on the Diverter suit mimic the colours of poisonous fish to warn the sharks off.

YOU SEE THIS IS FANTASTIC. THIS IS WHAT WE NEED TO DO. NOT KILL SHARKS BECAUSE THEY’RE CURIOUS AND ATTACK US. WE’RE IN THEIR WATERS. WE’RE MAKING THEIR HUNTING GROUNDS SMALLER.

outofthecavern:

malformalady:

Australian scientists have developed a pair of anti-shark wetsuits that make divers appear invisible by camouflaging their bodies in the sea and trick sharks into thinking surfers are poisonous. A team of researchers from the University of Western Australia joined forces with designers from  Shark Attack Mitigation Systems (SAMS) to create the suits. The blue pattern of the Elude suit can’t be seen by the shark because the fish are colour blind. While the stripes on the Diverter suit mimic the colours of poisonous fish to warn the sharks off.

YOU SEE THIS IS FANTASTIC. THIS IS WHAT WE NEED TO DO. NOT KILL SHARKS BECAUSE THEY’RE CURIOUS AND ATTACK US. WE’RE IN THEIR WATERS. WE’RE MAKING THEIR HUNTING GROUNDS SMALLER.

via .
Photo 19 Jul 234,040 notes 
J.R.R Tolkien, looking at flowers. Apparently people hated to go for walks with him because he would stop and look at every tree for like 20 minutes.

J.R.R Tolkien, looking at flowers. Apparently people hated to go for walks with him because he would stop and look at every tree for like 20 minutes.

(Source: flying-dutchwoman)

Photo 18 Jul 32 notes atlasobscura:


Modern Mortality: A Q&A with “American Afterlife” Author Kate Sweeney
by Allison Meier / 16 Jul 2014

The art of dying in the United States is in a league of its own in terms of options, and cost. While green burial sites sprawled through forests, and even underwater reefs where ashes have been transformed into future homes for fish, are growing in popularity, there are still the exorbitantly expensive coffins buried in carefully manicured cemeteries, the embalming, the obituaries. American Afterlife: Encounters in the Customs of Mourning by Kate Sweeney, published this March by the University of Georgia Press, goes on-the-ground in examining what the history of death is in the United States, and how it’s rapidly changing. We asked Sweeney, an Atlanta-based author and award-winning radio story producer with NPR affiliate WABE, about her walk through the shadow of death.
American Afterlife: Encounters in the Customs of Mourning by Kate Sweeney is available from University of Georgia Press. 
Full Story available at Atlas Obscura…

atlasobscura:

The art of dying in the United States is in a league of its own in terms of options, and cost. While green burial sites sprawled through forests, and even underwater reefs where ashes have been transformed into future homes for fish, are growing in popularity, there are still the exorbitantly expensive coffins buried in carefully manicured cemeteries, the embalming, the obituaries. American Afterlife: Encounters in the Customs of Mourning by Kate Sweeney, published this March by the University of Georgia Press, goes on-the-ground in examining what the history of death is in the United States, and how it’s rapidly changing. We asked Sweeney, an Atlanta-based author and award-winning radio story producer with NPR affiliate WABE, about her walk through the shadow of death.

American Afterlife: Encounters in the Customs of Mourning by Kate Sweeney is available from University of Georgia Press.

Full Story available at Atlas Obscura…

Video 17 Jul 193,040 notes

fencehopping:

Thunderstorm cloud lamp

Photo 14 Jul 252 notes portraitsofboston:

     “People always say that ‘home is where the heart is’, which I believe. My heart is in many different places: everywhere I’ve been, I’ve met people who made me feel at home. It’s usually hard the day I leave, but I know that I will make friends again wherever I go just as I did last time. But sometimes leaving makes me feel like a cold person because it’s so easy for me to leave people and move away. Yet I think that there are people in life that we move away from, which is natural. And then there are other people that we keep in our lives no matter where we go because they are important to us and we have a strong connection to them.”

portraitsofboston:

     “People always say that ‘home is where the heart is’, which I believe. My heart is in many different places: everywhere I’ve been, I’ve met people who made me feel at home. It’s usually hard the day I leave, but I know that I will make friends again wherever I go just as I did last time. But sometimes leaving makes me feel like a cold person because it’s so easy for me to leave people and move away. Yet I think that there are people in life that we move away from, which is natural. And then there are other people that we keep in our lives no matter where we go because they are important to us and we have a strong connection to them.”

Video 14 Jul 7,554 notes

ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via

The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.

Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.

In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.

via amfd.
Photo 14 Jul 9,092 notes herekitty:


G. Kero - Bowie Shirt

Wooooow

herekitty:

G. Kero - Bowie Shirt

Wooooow

(Source: pinterest.com)

Video 9 Jul 150,167 notes

sourcedumal:

2damnfeisty:

rozhanitsa:

2damnfeisty:

Nobody gives the black girl mob credit for being smart as fuck. They clown but at the end of the day they are really intelligent.

And it’s not subtle at all.
Taystee is a math prodigy in addition to being well-read, Poussey is multilingual, Cindy just knows shit, Suzanne studies Shakespeare, Watson was a good student in addition to being a track star, Vee is basically an evil genius. Piper often learns the most from them; they taught her how to fight and helped translate Pennsatucky’s biblical threat.
The show flat out acknowledges the (academic) intelligence of the black inmates time and time again, but the audience collectively ignores it.

ALL OF THIS

The intricacies of these women… Y’all just dont know!

(Source: ageofdesiderata)


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